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Split Pea Bacon 2 - Food Gypsy

Split Pea Bacon Soup, The Comfort of Green

Cold weather calls for deep comfort.  Nothing warms you from the inside out like a steaming bowl of Split Pea Bacon Soup.

A Twist on a French Canadian Classic

Historically made when the larder was low and fresh produce was hard to find.  Split pea soup is often started by using a ham hock or ham bone, but you really don’t need the ham bone to make a great pot of soup when you have bacon.

Split Pea Bacon Soup

Good Soup is Good Food

Starchy and smooth with the underlying smokiness that only a piece of good bacon gives, this Split Pea Bacon soup recipe starts with a bacon stock.  The stock is then strained and reserved and the bacon and onions are lightly roasted in the oven to crisp. This step changes the texture of the bacon from soggy and chewy to toasted and tasty.  From that point, this soup pretty much cooks itself, one quick blend and – soup’s on. The result is smooth and creamy, with just enough tooth to make you feel like you’re eating adult food.

Looking for lunch? Pair with a savory scone or a piece of rye toast.  Eat well.  Feel great.

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Split Pea Bacon 1 - Food Gypsy

Split Pea and Bacon Soup


  • Author: Cori Horton
  • Prep Time: 15 minutes
  • Cook Time: 1 hour
  • Total Time: 1 hour 15 minutes
  • Yield: Serves 4 - 6 1x

Description

A twist on a French Canadain Classic, Split Pea and Bacon Soup is a bowl of warmth and comfort on a cold day. Garnish with crisp bacon or brioche croutons and dig in!


Ingredients

Scale
  • 2 pounds double-smoked bacon, cut into chunky strips
  • 2 large onions, finely chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme ( or 2 sprigs fresh)
  • 1/2 teaspoon black peppercorns
  • 4 cups water
  • 1 cup chicken stock
  • 2 cups dry green (or yellow) split peas

Instructions

1)  Bacon Stock: In a deep pot over medium heat, add bacon and cook, stirring frequently, until fat is evenly rendered and bacon is opaque; about three minutes.  Add onions and garlic and sweat, stir as needed to mix, and cook evenly until onions are transparent, another three minutes or so.  Add water, bay leaves, thyme, and peppercorns and bring to a boil.  Reduce heat and simmer for 10 to 15 minutes.

2) Remove pot from heat and strain bacon stock into a bowl, reserving solids.  Add stock back to the pot and return to medium heat.  Add chicken stock and bring to a low boil.  Add split peas and reduce heat to a low simmer, stirring occasionally to ensure peas do not settle and stick to the bottom.  Cook for 20 – 30 minutes, until peas are soft and crush easily between your fingertips.

3) Preheat oven to 350°F (145°C).  While the peas cook, take stock solids and spread them onto a parchment-lined baking sheet.   Remove bay leaf, thyme sprigs if used and most of the peppercorns then place remaining ingredients, onions & bacon, and toast them in the oven for 6 to 10 minutes until firm and lightly toasted.  Remove from oven and reserve.

4)  When split peas are easily mash-able, blend lightly with an immersion blender being sure you leave enough chunky bits so that it still has that classic green pea soup look.  Stir in roasted bacon and onions and return to the heat if needed.

  • Category: Soups
  • Method: Stewing
  • Cuisine: Canadian

Keywords: Split Pea Bacon Soup, split pea Soup, Pea Soup Recipe

 

 

Cori Horton

Cooking in her home kitchen just outside Ottawa, Canada; Cori Horton is a food photographer, recipe blogger and Food Business Consultant. A Cordon Bleu-trained Chef, Cori spent five years as the owner of Nova Scotia's Dragonfly Inn, ten years in catering, and has been sharing all things delicious - right here - since 2010.

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